Monday, 29 January 2018

Retrospective: Jurassic Park (1993)

Holy shit, surprise, it's another Retrospective series! I honestly wasn't expecting to do another one of these, since they tend to take quite a bit of time, work and effort to put out to a level I'm happy with. That said, I was thinking back on the Jurassic Park film franchise just the other day and it was making me think of how interesting this series' journey has been, which started giving me that writer's itch. And so, let's launch into this with the first entry in the series, 1993's Jurassic Park...

Pretty much the definition of an iconic poster. Simple, but so evocative. In fact, it's so iconic that every subsequent poster in the series has aped it wholesale.

Normally I beat around the bush and try to act coy about what my overall thoughts on a film are in one of these reviews. I'm not even going to bother with that pretense here - Jurassic Park is a bloody classic. You know it and I know it too. I mention that up-front because it's relevant to note that the film is based on the Michael Crichton novel of the same name which, somehow, is even better than the movie in my opinion. The novel hits most of the same beats as the film, although basically every scene or character is different in some manner. Some particularly fun examples of differences from the original novel are that the lawyer, Donald Gennaro, was originally written as a muscle-bound badass who punches a velociraptor in the face when it bites him in the arm, John Hammond is originally a petulant and unrepentant corporate villain, and that the big climax with the raptors involves far more of the creatures on the loose which the heroes end up having to fight with freaking rocket launchers. In addition, the novel has much more detailed discussions about chaos theory, while also fitting in so many action sequences that the novel would still be plundered for inspiration in the next 2 sequels. The novel is also notably far more violent, with scenes including such gory imagery as babies being eaten in their cribs, men being disemboweled and eaten alive and dinosaurs getting blown in half. I actually wrote a paper in 12th grade about all the differences between the film and novel and the only element which survives basically intact is Denis Nedry's character, who is just as much of a slobbish buffoon in both mediums.

Sunday, 21 January 2018

Witch Hunts

Lately I have been reading Richard Beck's We Believe the Children: A Moral Panic in the 1980s, a very interesting tale of the social and political attitudes which helped to foster the 1980s "Satanic Panic" regarding daycares being places of ritual satanic sexual abuse. Thankfully our society is so far beyond such ridiculous hysteria, but there is a through-line in the narrative which has been making me slightly uneasy about the way that #MeToo has been progressing, especially after the backlash faced by Margaret Atwood after she made a cautionary op-ed about the movement.


To put it simply, the title of We Believe the Children shows the philosophy which was circulating during the 1980s - historically, the stories of abuse done to children have not been believed, therefore it is imperative that we believe the children because they will be honest and are too innocent to lie about sexual violence. Now, obviously this isn't a zero-sum game where you either believe the children or assume they always are lying, but there's obviously a level of discernment which needs to be taken into account. The main issues in the case of these kids were that the parents essentially coerced their children into making up stories of abuse (thereby giving them actual traumas to deal with later in life), prosecutors would refuse to believe that the children were telling the truth when they said that they weren't abused and would pressure them into giving a confession just so they would be allowed to leave, and the prevailing belief that children's accounts should not be questioned*.